Ed centre news

Nestled among its humble origins as a fishing village, Tsuen Wan has undergone a remarkable evolution, transforming into a modern residential and commercial hub. The district's journey began in the 1960s with the development of public housing estates, attracting a substantial population and fostering a strong sense of community. Today, Tsuen Wan thrives as a dynamic locale where the old and the new coexist harmoniously, with traditional markets and temples intermingling with contemporary shopping malls and towering skyscrapers.

Given that it is made up of a very small area that extends from Fortress Hill through North Point and Quarry Bay out to Siu Sai Wan and is encircled by mountains, the Eastern District has been likened as a sea snake writhing along the shores of Victoria Harbour. It is the second most populous district with 600,000 people living in under 19 square kilometers. According to archaeological findings from the Song Dynasty (AD 960–1279), the area began as a collection of fishing towns, subsequently transformed into quarries and dockyards, and is now a tangle of largely residential high rises.

As parents, it can be difficult to determine if your child’s after-school activities are effective or not. After all, you want to make sure that your child is getting the most out of their time and effort. Here are some tips on how you can evaluate whether an activity is helping your child reach their goals: 

As a parent, sometimes you just don’t have much bandwidth to spend hours chasing an education centre for answers to your questions on course curriculum and teacher qualifications. Instead, we often rely on heuristics to give us a shortcut to determine if an education centre is high quality. Has a work colleague or friend referred them? Have they been raved about in a facebook parent post?

But here are some quick steps a parent can take to answer this question themselves based on publicly available data:

 

Before the new term starts in January, we felt it was important to debunk some myths about signing up to after school activity programs at international schools. If you’re a parent with a child attending an international school, it is true that it may be logistically straightforward to have your child stay at school after lessons end to continue with extracurricular activities. This saves you having to plan a trip by car/taxi/MTR to another venue. However, there are some significant drawbacks to these programs which parents may not be aware of.

Did you know that the name Wan Chai (meaning small bay) is due to the fact that the coastline used to sit where Queen’s Road East now runs in the form of a small bay? Walking the streets of Wan Chai today, it’s hard to imagine that it was once a fishing village. The larger roads boast exhibition and conference complexes, luxury apartments, hotels, shopping malls, office towers and government buildings, and the smaller alleys swaddle chic boutiques and eateries.

The community of Tseung Kwan O was built in the 1980s on reclaimed land that used to be part of a narrow inlet called Junk Bay, lined with small fishing villages including Tseung Kwan O Village and Hang Hau Village. Over the past 30 years, Tseung Kwan O has been transformed into a vibrant community now affectionately referred to as TKO, largely because of its plethora of MTR stations (Po Lam, Hang Hau, Tseung Kwan O and Tiu Keng Leng), its proximity to Central (~10kms) and Kwun Tong (its western neighbour), and the numerous parks and shopping malls that dot its neighbourhoods.

Many parents think it is not necessary to take interest classes or other extracurricular activities if their children study hard enough, with an outstanding academic achievement. But have you ever thought that cultivating children to sustain a good hobby will bring unexpected benefits to them? Especially singing! Singing has the following benefits for the overall development and growth of children: